5D+ Teacher Evaluation Rubric

Commentary and suggested modifications and additions
http://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/5D+Teacher+Evaluation+Rubric+-+Professional+Collaboration+%26+Communication
SE1 Intellectual Work: Quality of questioning
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Comments & Questions
  • Teacher rarely or never asks questions to probe and deepen students’ understanding or uncover misconceptions
  • Teacher occasionally asks questions to probe and deepen students’ understanding or uncover misconceptions.
  • Teacher frequently asks questions to probe and deepen students’ understanding or uncover misconceptions.
  • Teacher assists students in clarifying their thinking with one another.
  • Teacher frequently asks questions to probe and deepen students’ understanding or uncover misconceptions.
  • Teacher assists students in clarifying and assessing their thinking with one another.
  • Students question one another to probe for deeper thinking.
  • Add - Teacher understands and uses a variety of questioning types and techniques.
  • Add - Students understand difference between Clarifying & Probing questions and use where needed
  • Add - Students understand that there are other ways to categorize questions such as Blooms, McKenzie, Short Answer/Long Answer
  • Add - Teachers and students engage in Socratic questioning
  • Add - Students ask themselves metacognitive questions in an ongoing manner throughout assignments, projects, and units.
  • Add - Students understand and apply skepticism to further their understanding
  • Question Starters
  • Questioning Toolkit
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher’s questions are at the knowledge level such as, “Where did the Civil War start?” “What states seceded from the Union during the Civil War?”

If a student answers incorrectly, teacher “corrects” the student and quickly moves to another knowledge question.

Possible Student Observables:
One student raises her hand and responds to teacher’s question with a one-word answer.

Another student answers teacher’s next question with another one-word answer."
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher’s questions are primarily at the knowledge level, and occasionally at an application level such as, “Describe in your own words what Lincoln meant by _” or “Why was Lincoln’s speech at Gettysburg significant?”

If a student answers incorrectly, teacher provides a brief explanation of why the answer is incorrect.

Possible Student Observable:
One student states, “Oh that makes sense, I now see why that answer is incorrect.”
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
The majority of teacher’s questions are at the application, analysis, synthesis or evaluation level such as, “How does what occurred during the final stages of the Civil War compare with what happened during the Revolutionary War?” or “What could have been the outcome of the war if the North had not won the battle at Gettysburg?”

If a student has faulty thinking or does not provide enough evidence for their response, teacher asks the entire class to discuss in their table groups and come up with other ideas.

Possible Student Observable:
At the end of a discussion in response to open-ended questions, students write down how their thinking has changed as a result of the discussion."
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
In addition to Proficient:

Teacher spends the beginning of a lesson explaining the difference between low and high level questions along with a process for students to question and respond to one another.

Possible Student Observables:
In addition to Proficient:
A student states to another student, “I do not agree with your analysis of the situation because ...” Another student responds, “That could be correct, but...”

One student says to another, “I used to think this way, but you brought up some good points, so now I think...”
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  • Add - Students have internalized some of the typical questions the teacher uses to probe students’ thinking.
  • Add - Teacher and students engage in class discussions and online discussions where student questions drive the conversation.
  • Students create and curate questions for a sample test to aid studying
  • Student questions drive their research or challenge based learning.

SE2 Student Engagement Intellectual Work: Ownership of learning
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Comments & Questions
  • Teacher rarely or never provides opportunities and strategies for students to take ownership of their own learning to develop, test and refine their thinking.
  • Teacher occasionally provides opportunities and strategies for students to take ownership of their learning. Locus of control is with teacher.
  • Add - Students have limited choice of topic or form of (re)presentation
  • Teacher provides opportunities and strategies for students to take ownership of their learning. Some locus of control is with students in ways that support students’ learning.
  • Add - Students have constrained choice of topic and form of (re)presentation OR topics and forms of (re)presentation are selected by class as a part of Challenge Based Learning or Project Based Learning
  • Teacher consistently provides opportunities and strategies for students to take ownership of their learning. Most locus of control is with students in ways that support students’ learning.
  • A significant part or all topics and forms of (re)presentation selected by students
  • Question - No mention of student choice of topic or student choice of process? Or, is that the "locus of control" they mention?
  • Question - No mention of the role of reflection on their learning? Could that possibly be what they mean by "strategies for students to take ownership of their learning."?
  • Question - What experiences do/will students have to help them develop an understanding of this “control” and ways to leverage it that support their own learning?
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
During a unit of study on realistic fiction, teacher provides students the same books to read during independent reading time.

Students are expected to read the same number of pages per day and answer the same, mostly knowledge or comprehension, questions.

Possible Student Observables:
Students all read the same realistic fiction book during independent reading time.

Students answer the questions with one- or two-word responses and check off in a reading log that they completed the task.
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
During a unit of study on realistic fiction, teacher provides students with a choice of three different titles that they can read during independent reading time.

Students in the same books are expected to read the same number of pages per day and answer the same, mostly knowledge or comprehension, questions and share their answers with each other.

Possible Student Observable:
Students reading the same realistic fiction book during independent reading time answer questions and check with each other to see if they have the same answers.

Students answer the questions with one- or two-word responses and check off in a reading log that they completed the task.
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
During a unit of study on realistic fiction, teacher has the librarian give book talks on 10 different titles. Students are taught how to choose a book at their level and all students read the realistic fiction book of their choice during independent reading time.

At the end of each independent reading time, students are asked to reflect on what they are learning about the genre of realistic fiction.

Possible Student Observable:
After reflecting on their own book, students meet as a whole group to discuss what their books have in common and what they are learning about the genre of realistic fiction.
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"Possible Teacher Observables:
In addition to Proficient: Teacher prompts students to begin literature circle discussions.

Possible Student Observables:
Students meet in book groups to discuss what their books have in common and what they are learning about the genre of realistic fiction.
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  • Add - Student generated curriculum?
  • Add - Student generated assessment (rubrics)
  • Add - Opportunities for Self-Directed Learning
  • Add - Students don't look for teacher's approval
  • Add - Teachers are seen as learners too
  • Lit circles and book groups are the only way to process student thinking about books? Does research say that is the only best practice? How does it compare to other methods? Why are all of these examples so 20th century?
  • How does this fit with existing efforts such as Students as Contributors: The Digital Learning Farm

SE3  Engagement Strategies: High cognitive demand
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Comments & Questions
  • Teacher expectations and strategies engage few or no students in work of high cognitive demand.
  • Teacher expectations and strategies engage some students in work of high cognitive demand.
  • Teacher expectations and strategies engage most students in work of high cognitive demand.
  • Teacher expectations and strategies engage all students in work of high cognitive demand.
  • Questions - What is "high cognitive demand? Facetiously, does high cognitive demand simply mean memorizing a lot? Does this mean application of information/knowledge? Does this mean creative thought? Original thought? Synthesized thought?
  • Does this often depend on the level of teacher questioning AND student questioning achieved for SE1?
  • Are students more likely to put in the effort to achieve this higher level of thinking if they have ownership of the learning (SE2)?
Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher writes a problem on the board about finding the surface area of an irregular shape. Teacher poses questions such as, “What is the hypotenuse?” “What is the answer?”

Possible Student Observables:
The same two or three students call out answers to teacher’s questions.
"Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher writes a problem on the board about finding the surface area of an irregular shape and asks students to work independently to solve the problem.

Teacher pulls popsicle sticks out of a jar, calls on five students randomly to explain how they solved the problem, and the other students are asked to pose questions to the five students.

Possible Student Observable:
Students work independently to solve the problem and respond to teacher’s questions when called upon. Some students pose questions to their classmates.
"Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher writes a problem on the board about finding the surface area of an irregular shape, asks students to work independently to solve the problem, and then asks students to turn to a partner and explain how they solved it.

Possible Student Observable:
Students work independently to solve the problem and all turn to a partner to explain how they solved it.
"Possible Teacher Observables:
Teacher writes a problem on the board about finding the surface area of an irregular shape. Students work independently to solve the problem.

Teacher asks students to use their “A/B” partners. “A” partners are asked to turn to their partner and explain how they solved the problem. “B” partners are asked to restate what “A” said and whether they agree or not and why. Teacher monitors for student participation while partners share.

Possible Student Observables:
Students work independently to solve the problem and all turn to a partner to explain how they solved it. Students restate their partner’s’ reasoning, whether or not they agree, and why.
  • Add - Teacher differentiates instruction
  • Add - Teacher provides scaffolding to move to higher cognitive demand, then uses a Gradual Release of Responsibility approach so students can internalize it
  • Add - Teachers flip Bloom's starting with students creating which requires them to use the rest of Bloom's
  • Add - Students know, understand, and use the Habits of Mind (or Visible Thinking or ...)
  • Add - Teachers promote a growth mindset by allowing F.A.I.L.ure and the learning gains that can come from it
  • Add - Teachers provide ample opportunities for student metacognition and metacognition of metacognition. Students reflect on their learning and thinking in an ongoing manner
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SE1 Intellectual Work: Quality of questioning
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Comments & Questions
  • The lesson is not based on grade level standards. There are no learning targets aligned to the standard. The lesson does not link to broader purpose or a transferable skill.
  • The lesson is based on grade level standards and the learning target(s) align to the standard. The lesson is occasionally linked to broader purpose or a transferable skill.
  • The lesson is based on grade level standards and the learning target(s) align to the standard. The lesson is frequently linked to broader purpose or a transferable skill.
  • The lesson is based on grade level standards and the learning target(s) align to the standard. The lesson is consistently linked to broader purpose or a transferable skill.
  • What if you plan mini-lessons, projects, or units instead instead of lessons?What about connecting across projects or units? What about multi-age curriculum and connecting across years or in Engage's 6 years.
Possible Teacher Observables:
A 6th grade teacher presents a lesson on the American Revolution. Content and skills are 5th grade standards.

A 6th grade teacher presents a lesson on African geography that meets 6th grade standards. Lesson is not connected to a broader purpose such as how African geography is important to the current economics of the continent or how the skills learned will apply to a subsequent geography lesson. There is no learning target.
Possible Teacher Observables:
A 6th grade teacher presents a lesson on revolutions in Africa. Content and learning target(s) are 6th grade standards.

A 6th grade teacher only explains how geography skills are used at the beginning of the unit. Learning target(s) come from the teacher’s manual and are aligned to standards.
Possible Teacher Observables:
In addition to Basic:

Teacher explains at the beginning and close of each lesson how the study of African geography will help students understand current events in Africa. This is repeated each week of the unit.

When reviewing the week, teacher explains how the skills learned in the current lesson will be used in subsequent geography lessons.
Possible Teacher Observables:
In addition to Proficient:

Teacher explains at the beginning, middle and end of the lesson how the study of African geography is relevant to American students.

When teaching African geography, teacher reminds students that they will approach the current geography lesson using the same skills learned in the study of Asia.

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Transfer as the point of education
Glossary

Is the idea of hesitency to teach in the rubric?
http://www.getsportiq.com/2014/12/great-teachers-are-hesitant-to-teach/

Student risk taking is in CEC7, but no mention of teacher risk taking.

Does this fit with the category of transcendent? Does it connect with how the Thinkering Studio rubric was designed?
http://www.teachthought.com/learning/schools-prepared-great-teachers/