Google Search Skills

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Resources:

Google Search Scenarios: Mini-Challenges

Problem - I'm an eighth grade student who needs to learn more about Sam Adams for my history class, but there are a lot of people with that name, including a singer, a mayor, and a football player. What search terms can I add so that most of the results on the first page of Google link to pages on the person I want?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I have a line from a poem or song stuck in my head. It goes something like this, Continuous as the stars that shine and twinkle on the Milky Way. If I search for stars and milky way in Google, all I find are pages about astronomy. What is the best way to search for this poem so I can read the rest and find out who wrote it?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I'm interested in learning more about the history of kayaks. There seem to be two words, Eskimo and Inuit, somewhat synonymously used and writers only seem to use one or the other. How can I search for pages that have information about the history of kayaks and either of those words?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I'm having problems with my iPad battery not lasting very long. I want to find out from Apple itself what to do. How could I use Google to only get information specifically from Apple about this issue?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I want to learn more about General David Petraeus. Unfortunately, most of the links I find are about his affair. What advanced search technique can I use to cut out most of the stories focusing on his affair?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - Same problem as above, but how do I use the "Search tools" drop down menu to cut out all links to pages/stories since the affair became public?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I want to learn more about the Fair Trade movement. A friend said they saw a Flash movie or a powerpoint on it in another class (they knew it wasn't on YouTube). How can I use Google to limit my search to just links to Flash or PowerPoint results?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - Mr. Whitmer wants us to find a quality site about Canadian immigration, but he will only accept sites from Canada and the American government. How can I tell Google only to find those kinds of sites?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - Mr. Whitmer says I am mistaken about the actual meaning of the word "communism". What search operator can I type into the Google search box so that my first result will be a definition of the word? (Not using the advanced Google search page, though you can try that for a clue.)
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I want to find a site that focuses on the elderly in Europe, but there are a whole bunch of words that are similar. What search operator can I use to find words that are similar to elderly?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - I'm tired of using the same old current events resources. I'd like to add in a wider number of resources including books, blogs, and scholarly research (this is the extra challenge of the three). How can I search just Google's books, blogs, or scholarly research?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - One of the videos suggested using the intext: search operator. How is this different from the techniques we've already learned about?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - The Wikipedia page I found when searching for information on President Eisenhower's nickname is looong! I definitely don't want to read the whole thing! How can I search within a web page that Google says has information about his nickname(s)? What was/were his nickname(s)?
  1. Answer:
  2. Tip: (Delete this and put in a general tip about Google that the problem above exemplifies.)
  3. Use Skitch to show a similar search (and the results), but related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.

Problem - Oh great, we're almost done, so Mr. Whitmer thinks we must about be Google geniuses, but he's not sure we actually understand how to combine these techniques to find even more specific information.
  1. Combination Example 1 - Use Skitch to show a search (and the results) that combines two techniques related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.
  2. Combination Example 1 - Use Skitch to show a search (and the results) that combines three techniques related to a topic/subtopic from our study of the Great Lakes or Canadian Settlement.


Done early, try these:
  1. In response to the query ice cream 98115, Google gives you where you can find ice cream near Seattle, WA, whose zip code is 98115. Find pizza places near where you live. Which one do you like the best?
  2. Find a cinema showing a recently released film that you wish to see. How did you do it?
  3. In response to the query define:deipnosophist, Google gives you definitions of deipnosophist. Find a sculpture definition of caryatid.
  4. Find the year that laptops were invented by using the query laptops invented 1900..2000.
  5. You have been assigned a report on former President Bill Clinton. What year was he inaugurated?
  6. Using Google, to write a multiplication problem you use a * to represent what you write as x. Therefore, 3x5=15 would be written as 3*5=15 in Google.
  7. Which is larger 1 * 2 * 3 * 4 * 5 * 6 * 7 * 8 * 9 * 10 (also written as 10! and spoken as "10 factorial") or 9*9*9*9*9*9*9, which can be more succinctly represented as 9^7 or 9**7?
  8. Convert 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit into Celsius.
  9. What can people find out about you on the Internet? Search for your own name and see what you find.
    • Search for your home address in Google.
    • Search for your phone number in Google.
    • Search for your school email in Google.

  1. What's one trick that hasn't been covered yet?
  2. Create a Six Degrees of Separation challenge for someone else.
  3. Try A Google A Day Challenge